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To do A in advance; do A as preparation for something else
(used with transitive verbs)

  1. To do A in advance; do A as preparation for something else
    (used with transitive verbs)
  2. To leave as is in the state A
    (used with transitive verbs)
19
         しておいた   
I printed out the train's time table for you.
8
あの     ために  って    ください  
Put that book aside for me.
4
あなた        めて        
I will write down your name and address.
5
あなた  ために             もらった   
I asked Mom to get some for you.
15
             
Please gather the evidence at the crime scene.
3
                   ください  
Parents, please check your child's itinerary.
6
  コーヒー         ください  
Please prepare some coffee for him.
3
トイレ             
I replaced the light bulb in the bathroom.

Getting the sentences
Construction
(Elements in parentheses are optional.)
AVerb: て-form
おく
Basic Examples:
いておく (to write in advance)

Notes
Often shown as preparation for something in the future.
Related Expressions
Where this grammar is found


User notes
0

When ておく is used with the causative form, it can also let you express things like the following sentences:
させておく = I'll let him sleep (but I'll wake him up later).
かせておく = I'll let her cry (but I'll talk to her later).
It shows you leave something be for now and suggests you'll only act later.
3 years ago
avatar guest
7
ておく is often shortened to とく.

Example:
えとけ!(→ えておけ!)
13 years ago
avatar 宮本勝利 - Level 1
 
To leave as is in the state A
(used with transitive verbs)

  1. To do A in advance; do A as preparation for something else
    (used with transitive verbs)
  2. To leave as is in the state A
    (used with transitive verbs)
Join for free or Login to study this and other grammar in the lesson Verb Review I!
16
          ください  
Keep the change.
22
                        
"Leave me alone!" she said angrily.
5
        して           
You should not leave the baby alone.
12
       
Leave it off.
11
                
Don't leave your dog in all day.
7
ドア           
Don't leave the door open.
9
そこ        
Leave it closed.
7
宿         いい   
Is it ok if you put your homework aside?
3
      そのままに しておいて    
Please leave her luggage as is.

Getting the sentences
Construction
(Elements in parentheses are optional.)
AVerb: て-form
おく


User notes
0

ておく can be used with the ないで form to express something along the lines of "I won't do it now (but might later)."
わないでおく = I won't say it now (but I might say it later).
わないでおく = I won't buy it now (but I might buy it some other time).

When it's used with the causative form, it can also let you express things like the following sentences:
させておく = I'll let him sleep (but I'll wake him up later).
かせておく = I'll let her cry (but I'll talk to her later).
It shows you leave something be for now and suggests you'll only act later.
3 years ago
avatar guest

Discussion about this grammar
avatar
Years Studied: 3
Studying: JLPT N3 & JLPT 2
Level: 1, : 99
It's transitive verb + ておく (according to the Unicom gammar book) :)
0
13 years ago (Edited 13 years ago.)
avatar
Site admin
Level: 110, : 6,629
Thanks - I updated the definitions!
0
13 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: 6
Studying: N1
Level: 1, : 322
The "show construction examples" link seems to be wrong - it shows plain form+おく, not てform + おく
0
13 years ago
avatar
Site admin
Level: 110, : 6,629
Fixed it, thanks!
0
13 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: 6
Studying: N1
Level: 1, : 322
I've seen the same problem on another grammar point today - I forget which one. I'll keep an eye out.
0
13 years ago
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Years Studied: 11 months
Studying: This site
Level: 1, : 360
whats the diffrence between Teoku and tearu in the sense of leaving as is?
IF nobody minds explaining
0
11 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: 3
Studying: JLPT N3
Level: 1, : 286
I noticed that the last example sentence in the first grammar section has a mistake with the highlighting. Should it be like this? 「げんでしょうこを[color=red]あつめてく[/color]。」 Please [color=red]gather[/color] the evidence at the crime scene.
1
10 years ago
avatar
Site admin
Level: 110, : 6,629
Updated the coloring, thanks!
0
10 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: N/A
Studying: Kanji Kentei
Level: 3, : 638
Ogawa5, your post cuts out so I hope I'm answering your question... Funny, I never thought of these two grammar points as related/similar until I tried explaining the usage :) Compare: そのはもうているからドアをけておく。 I'm going to be asleep at that time so I will leave the door open for you. ドアがけてある。 The door has been left open. いてある。 It's in the contract. いておく。 I'll put it in the contract. いておいた。 I put it in the contract. It's not about the tense per se (more about the intention) but that's how it naturally translates.
3
10 years ago
guest
Incidentally, I've done some thinking about this lately for my own understanding. Here's what I came up with. When you think about it, the following three verb forms are closely related: [color=blue](1) 「される」[/color] [color=green](2) 「してある」[/color] [color=purple](3) 「しておく」 [/color] The real difference between these three forms is a matter of [b][u]strength of purpose[/u][/b]. What do I mean by that? Well, let's look at an example: [color=blue](1) 「にメッセージがかれている。」 The message is written on the paper.[/color] [color=green](2) 「にメッセージがいてある。」 The message has been written on the paper. [/color] [color=purple](3) 「にメッセージをいておいた。」 The message was written on the paper for later.[/color] To me the real difference between these three sentences is [b]why[/b] the message was written. [color=blue]In (1), the plain passive voice does not say anything about [b]why[/b] the message was written. It [b]just describes the state of things[/b].[/color] [color=green]In (2), 「~てある」 indicates that the message was written [b]by someone for some reason[/b], but we aren't sure what that reason is.[/color] [color=purple]In (3), 「~ておく」 indicates that the message was written [b]for a specific reason[/b] - the message is [b]expected to be useful for someone later[/b].[/color] So, I would say that in terms of [b][u]strength of purpose[/u][/b], [color=blue](1) has the weakest purpose[/color], [color=green](2) has a stronger purpose than (1)[/color], and [color=purple](3) has the strongest and most certain purpose of all[/color].
7
10 years ago



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