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Even though A; in spite of A

  1. Even though A; in spite of A
  2. In order to A; in the process of doing A
    Only verbs of volition can be used with this pattern.
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   った のに  した  
Even though I put on suntan lotion, I got burned!
9
 ちゃん  すごく    のに             する 
Even though my grandfather is doing well, in front of other people he acts as if he is sick.
12
  している のに キス    された  
Even though we're engaged she wouldn't let me kiss her.
9
あんなに      った のに  また     ちちゃった   
Even though you tried so desperately, you flunked again?
6
   んでる のに         さえ しない  
Though he lives next door, he doesn't even say hello to us.

Getting the sentences
Construction
(Elements in parentheses are optional.)
AVerb: Casual
 
Aい-adjective
 
Aな-adjective
 
ANoun
 
 
のに
Basic Examples:
ったのに (even though (I) said)

しいのに (although (she's) beautiful)

便のに (although it's useful)

なのに (even though it's sunny)

Notes
While のに had a rather wide range of uses, it generally precedes a clause that is surprising or different from what was expected. Although it is often used to mark a complaint or negative viewpoint about a situation, this is not always the case.
Related Expressions
Where this grammar is found


User notes
0

Basically, there should be dissatisfaction/discontent/complaint/etc or surprise feeling/implication in order to use this feature of のに. If there are no such feeling/implication, use が or けど instead.

At least that's what written on and I understood from goo.ne.jp
5 years ago
 
In order to A; in the process of doing A
Only verbs of volition can be used with this pattern.

  1. Even though A; in spite of A
  2. In order to A; in the process of doing A
    Only verbs of volition can be used with this pattern.
Join for free or Login to study this and other grammar in the lesson Conjunctions!
ゆかた  のに かんがかかった  
It took a lot of time to put on the yukata.
-2
      びに   のに いつも くっついてった  
I always went along with my older brothers to play.
3
          ってしまった  
It took time to tie my shoelaces.
4
宿  やる      から  パソコン  って   
I need it to do my homework, so buy me a computer!

Getting the sentences
Construction
(Elements in parentheses are optional.)
AVerb: Dictionary Form
のに
Basic Examples:
のに (in order to fight)

Related Expressions
Where this grammar is found


User notes
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Discussion about this grammar
avatar
Grammar mod. Level: 1, : 479
のに can also mean "in the process of doing something" or "in order to do something."

+のに え:むのに

It seems to be only with verbs of volition.
5
12 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134
I thought volitional verbs were of the form ~おう, like たべよう or かおう. However, in both your example and a few that I looked up, this wasn't the case; is there a different meaning to volitional that I'm not aware of?
2
12 years ago
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Grammar mod. Level: 1, : 479
Ah, sorry maybe I'm saying it wrong. I simply meant an act that was done with intention, such as eating, drinking, speaking etc. The verb form for this is just the standard dictionary form.
0
12 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134
Well, the dictionary I confirmed your information in also said 'volitional verbs', so there is something to it. Maybe it means transitive verbs - with a direct object?
0
12 years ago
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Grammar mod. Level: 1, : 479
Further info: this can only be used with the non-past dictionary form.

About that transitive idea, I'm not totally sure. For most of the examples the verb is manipulating a direct object using を but a couple leave it out. I guess I don't completely understand this grammar point, sorry.
2
12 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134
Hehe - no worry, maybe someone else will chime in. As for the transitive bit - even if the direct object is left out (implied or mentioned in a previous sentence), it is still transitive.
0
12 years ago
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Years Studied: 7
Studying:
Level: 1, : 613
I think the grammar pattern fareastfurfaro is referring to is when you have to nominalize a verb using の then using に with a verb or adjective that requires such a particle.
For example,

Japanese: このスプーンはアブサンをるのにちょうどい。
English: This spoon is perfect for making absinthe.
2
12 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134
That would make sense - however, can you enlighten us on what the 'volitional verbs' markings mean that both he and I have independently found?
0
12 years ago
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Years Studied: 7
Studying:
Level: 1, : 613
I'm not quite sure what the two of you are talking about. Could you please provide an example sentence or two?
0
12 years ago
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Grammar mod. Level: 1, : 479
I think 's sentence is dead on. Basically, the use of volition simply means that the actor can control the initiation of an action. Make as in the example above, as well as eat, drink, sleep, etc. The problem is, やろう、もう, etc. are also referred to as volitional verbs, making this more confusing.
2
12 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134
I wouldn't worry about it, . We're just discussing the meaning of the word volition. Your sentence is a perfect example of the grammar point. However, in the grammar dictionary that I consulted to confirm what furfaro was saying, it had very similar sentences along with a note underneath it saying 'only non-past, dictionary, volitional verbs can be used in this fashion'. Since most studiers of Japanese associate 'volitional' with the よう form of the verb, we were trying to figure out what 'volitional' meant when referring to verbs in a sentence like yours.
2
12 years ago
Level: 1, : 0
I found an example in JED for android where のに is used. I didn't quite understand it: におをいれるのにしかった = (translated as): The girl was busy making tea for her friends. When I first read it I thought it said: Even though she was making tea she was busy. Can somebody explain?
0
8 years ago
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Years Studied: Never enough!
Studying:
Level: 1, : 556
You have to parse the sentence as おをいれるの + に - the girl was busy with the act of making tea. のに meaning "although" definitely outnumbers instances of の + に in terms of frequency of usage, but the other pattern isn't uncommon either, so it's good to keep in the back of your mind. Here's another similar example: くのにかった - literally, "It took time in solving the problem," or "Solving the problem took time."
4
8 years ago
Years Studied: 2 years
Studying: Grammar and vocabulary
Level: 1, : 52
hmm... thats wasn't even my question and I found that very helpful! Definitely will be keeping that in mind!
0
8 years ago
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Years Studied: 15
Studying: N2
Level: 1, : 66
I found a good example: レポートをくのにした。(I had a very hard time writing the report.)
2
8 years ago
Studying: N1
Level: 1, : 23
In terms of your discussion about volitional and non-volitional verbs, the distinction is about whether you can control the action and is important for a large number of Japanese grammar points. アイスをべるのに、スプーンがです。 (here as others have noted の is functioning as a nominalizer -- note that there is a second のに that means "despite") VS. せるように、します。 らないように、かにべます。 The ように construction only accepts non-volitonal verbs, i.e. things you cannot directly control.
1
8 years ago
Level: 1, : 0
Sorry, my computer doesn't have the proper language pack at the moment therefore I cannot write in proper Japanese but here is the way noni works, basing myself from the begginer dictionary for Japanese grammar and Kodansha dictionary of Japanese particle. First and foremost, you'll be creating nominalized sentences using noni. In front of an adjective-noun it will be na noni, datta.Often Noni means although or Even though. At the end of a spoken sentence, it express discontent. The other way to see noni is ''in the process of doing'' ''for the purpose of'' Taberu noni would be ''in order to eat...''or Boku wa nihongo no shimbun wo yomu noni jisho wo tsukau ''I use a dictionary in order to read a japanese newspaper'' When it comes to Verbs of motion, noni sets a precedent where no time was wasted. Finally it can indicate a mean or material with which X can be accomplished such as ''kono hako hon wo ireru noni choodo ii ne'' This box is perfect for putting the box in isnt it. noni rep. ''for''
0
8 years ago
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Years Studied: ほぼ3
Studying: N4
Level: 1, : 88
いているのに,どうしてびにける?
How can I go and have fun when everybody else is working?

This sentence is from goo.ne.jp, where should I put it?

0
5 years ago (Edited 5 years ago.)
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134

On the grammar pages, we request that only originals made by users are added. We may or may not have permission from ones written on other sites, so we need to be careful with those!

0
5 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134

My apologies! At the top of grammar page, there is a button that you can click to pop open the entry area. Looks like this:


CWYGZlu.png


Let me know if, for any reason, that is not appearing for you!


0
5 years ago
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Years Studied: ほぼ3
Studying: N4
Level: 1, : 88

I'm sorry... but that wasn't what I meant. That sentence doesn't fit into any categories in this page. It's neither 'even though' nor 'in order to', it's 'when', with some kind of comparison. Shouldn't you add other category for this grammar pattern?

0
5 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134

Got it!


https://www.renshuu.org/grammar/130/%E3%81%AE%E3%8...


This is the actual grammar pattern. の (it is one of the ones on that page).


The の changes it into a noun, after which it can be followed by a number of particles (の、が、は、を) are the most common. Since it doesn't always bind with the の, it can go on the page linked above!

0
5 years ago
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Years Studied: ほぼ3
Studying: N4
Level: 1, : 88

You sure about it? That doesn't seem right to me.


いているのに,どうしてびにける? How can I go and have fun when everybody else is working?


Please refer to the original page. There, its meaning is associated to "...とくらべ", but it sounds more like 'while' and 'when'.


Another example,

れられているのにいてはいられるかよ!

1) How can I be composed while my comrades being beaten one by one!

2) Don't you ever think that I can settle down when my comrades being beaten one by one!

2) Do you think I can calm down even though my comrades being beaten one by one!?


What do you think?

0
5 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134

Alright, I need to apologize - I have not given each of the posts you've made enough of my time to get a clear picture of things. I'm sorry for that, and I've added a month of free renshuu pro into your order history as a small sign of thanks for your patience.


That being said, back to the sentence.


To be honest, the English translation is not what I would give it if I was just shown the sentence without any context. I'd probably guess at "How can everyone go and have fun (play/etc) even though you're all working?


But that aside, given the original translation, I could certainly see it as "even though everyone else is working?" as an alternate translation that captures the same meaning.


Still, though, I feel like that would fall under this pages first definition - that is, displaying a clause that is contrary to what the speaker expects. Everyone else is working, so to the speaker, it seems unfair/not expected that they would be able to go out.


I don't think "when" is the best entry for in if it's being put into a grammar dictionary, simply because it wouldn't provide the framing for "when" that is needed.


It's kind of like a lot of Japanese I see that once has a single Japanese phrase, but could cover many different English translations, all of which are contextually valid. However, it would cause trouble when going back from English to Japanese, because you'd need to be careful to capture the nuance of the sentence.


Were we given "How can I go and have fun when everybody else is working?" and asked to translate it to Japanese, my guess is that the majority of people would try to use something like , which would not do nearly as good of a job as のに does.


Sorry for going back and forth, but I don't think these things necessarily have a single, definitive answer (or place) to which they would belong, but in my opinion, it can go in the "even though/despite" meaning on this page.

0
5 years ago
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Years Studied: ほぼ3
Studying: N4
Level: 1, : 88

No need to apologize, really. ^_^ I just want to discuss and know exactly what do you think about it. But thanks for the 'gift', I will try to put it into use.


Well, I'm not sure which is right or wrong, but this my understanding based on what is written in the original page.


いているのに,どうしてびにける?

This expression is kind of idiomatic, so it will hardly makes sense if we translate it literally. We have to put it in another words.


いているのに、」

Everybody else is working(, so)


「どうしてびにける?」- doesn't mean an ability, but possibility.

How can I go and have fun (leaving them, instead of it I should help them, right?)


Meanwhile,

"Even though everybody else is working, how can I (be able to or possible) go?" - this translation doesn't make sense, in any way.


In short, the sentence means,

"Everyone is working, so its obvious that I cannot leave them and have fun for myself." - it's an opposing statement


For instance, perhaps someone told you "Can you just leave?"


The のに was translated to 'while' or 'when' because they are the close in meaning and fit. It also a kind of comparison between two contradict events, working' and 'playing', which is the reason it is associated to とべ.


I've tried to make my own sentence based on this (in my previous comment) to make it more evident. The third translation felt a bit off to me, though.

れられているのにいてはいられるかよ!


So if we were put this expression into the first definition, wouldn't it be wrong? The nuance is different and we can't translate it as 'even though' either.


One note is that cannot be wrong, even if there is any, it can't be significant.

0
5 years ago
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Years Studied: 13
Level: 1, : 908

I would say, since they're contrasting actions (working/having fun), I would put it in the 1st category:


"How can I go have fun despite everyone else working?"


のに being so versatile, it's very hard to pin down in translation.

0
5 years ago
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Years Studied: ほぼ3
Studying: N4
Level: 1, : 88

Seems better. Just one more thing, if there is no need to add another category, shouldn't additional (advanced usage) explanation be added instead? Since this usage need specific context, i.e. opposing statement toward something else.


Based on what I understood from , the general usage always imply either surprise feeling or complaint. On the other hand, the aforementioned usage is more like opposing statement, rather than complaint. If we don't include the explanation, no one will aware about this specific usage.

0
5 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134

Sorry for the delay. Went ahead and expanded out the notes a little bit, based on our discussion/examples, and some other sources I looked into. I noticed you had added a usage note - feel free to add example sentences within your note if you feel it will help explain the point.

0
5 years ago
Level: 1, : 0

I have a quick question. I'm reading a book and a character poutily exclaims: もうまれてたらだったのに

Is this probably falling under "often used to mark a complaint or negative viewpoint about a situation," or might I be missing something? For more context, her friends are both a grade higher so she missed out on spending an extra year with them in their current school.

0
5 years ago (Edited 5 years ago.)
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134

Right - it's like "If only I had been born a year earlier, we would have been in the same grade year" - so definitely a complaint.

0
5 years ago
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Years Studied: ???
Studying: JLPT N2/N1 -------- 33 Games Completed in Japanese
Level: 106, : 330

the example sentence under のに 2 seems wrong:
びにくのにもくっいてった。
I always went along with my older brothers to play.

should be removed, unless I'm mistaken

0
5 months ago
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Years Studied: ???
Studying: JLPT N2/N1 -------- 33 Games Completed in Japanese
Level: 106, : 330

sorry for the consecutive post, but this is unrelated and came up just now: this page is missing a のに usage :)
https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%81%AE%E3%81%AB-597141

1 …に。…に。「るのにえておこう」

hm4wdmkwttwq63byqe0tqat0v.png

I think this image shows the usage as well

0
5 months ago
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Site admin
Level: 55, : 5,134

I wonder if the second definition should not just be expanded a bit to show that. All that is *really* happening is not のに, but の (nominalizing the verb phrase before it) and に the particle. That would better cover the usage already in there, since instead of "in order to", it would be "when X is done", Y (which would include listing something necessary for doing X)

0
5 months ago



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