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A still exists; still doing A; A is still occuring

  1. A still exists; still doing A; A is still occuring
  2. Haven't done A yet
カオ ちゃん  まだ おんせん はい       
Kao-chan is still in the onsen.
2
  まだ 4  ある  
There are still four peaches.
4
    まだ          
Yamaguchi was still eating lunch.
3
まだ    こんなに あります  
There's still this much money!
3
まだ        
Are you still waiting?

Getting the sentences
Construction
(Elements in parentheses are optional.)
まだ
ANoun
いる/ある
Basic Examples:
まだある (there's still time)

まだ
AVerb: て-form
いる
Basic Examples:
まだべている (still eating)

Where this grammar is found


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Haven't done A yet

  1. A still exists; still doing A; A is still occuring
  2. Haven't done A yet
4
この    まだ       
I haven't seen this movie yet.
3
    まだ           ない  
Taiichi hasn't (yet) met Mr. Tanaka before.
3
まだ       には         
I haven't gone to the new library yet.

Getting the sentences
Construction
(Elements in parentheses are optional.)
まだ
AVerb: て-form
いません
Where this grammar is found


User notes
No user notes have been added. Logged-in users can add user notes.

Discussion about this grammar
avatar
Level: 1, : 236
So I was talking to a Japanese person in Japanese several months ago and we got to talking about family at one point during the conversation. One of the things I said while on that topic was that, "I am still living with my parents." まだんでいます。The guy said he didn't understand if I was still living with them or not though because he said まだ is negative or something like that (basically that it's something like the 2nd usage here). So it seemed like he was saying that the first usage of まだ here is wrong, but I'm pretty sure I've heard まだ used in a positive sense while watching stuff in Japanese.

My question then is what went wrong here? Because if I had to guess, I would say it looks like まだ in the positive "still" sense can only be used with more action-oriented verbs and that む is treated more as a state than an action; む does use the に particle instead of で after all. If this is the case, then can まだ not be used with other state-like verbs or other verbs that use に(え:める), or is む just an exception?
1
11 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 62, : 5,642
I'm going to go way out on a limb here, and hope that someone else can give additional information. I'd have to wonder if it might be a cultural expectation here that guides that meaning of まだ. I'm American, and most people in the States establish 'independence' from their parents at an early age: moving out, finding their own place, etc. It's so strong that when you say "I'm still living with my parents", there is an implication (most of the time) that you'd leave if you can, but something is keeping you there.

Japanese youth, on the other hand, tend to stay in the house for a much longer period of time, and I wonder if saying "I'm still living with my parents" over "I'm living with my parents" suggests disrespect? Again, just a guess.

I did double check some grammar resources, and it can certainly be used with the positive form. Just feels like there's a more subtle nuance that took place in your conversation.
2
11 years ago
Level: 1, : 195
for the first grammar point there are other kind of verb forms that can go with it (i.e. らない、りたい). Is there a way that you can clear that up?
0
10 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 62, : 5,642
I think those might fall under 'common' usage that don't require an explicit grammar explanation (in the same way that grammar pages don't exist for many adverbs like よく or けっこう). In fact, I would say that the first grammar example on the page would fall into that 'common usage' category, except that it was explicitly referred to in the old JLPT grammar lists.
0
10 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: 3
Studying: JLPT N3
Level: 1, : 274
I am a little perplexed on one point here. まだ comes before the verb, but I am wondering, if it is a linked verb, such as リンゴをたべる。 Where would まだ go? Before リンゴ or before べる? まだリンゴをべている。 リンゴをまだべている。
0
9 years ago (Edited 9 years ago.)
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Site admin
Level: 62, : 5,642
Without putting too much though into it, I believe they are both valid, and adjust the focus of the sentence. If I am right,then... まだリンゴをべている。 <<This would possibly imply that you have eaten other things, but not the apple. リンゴをまだべている。 <<This sounds like the emphasis is on the action of eating, compared to other things that you could do to an apple (clean it, peel it, cut it, etc).
3
9 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: since 10/2013
Studying: ならおうとする, N5
Level: 1, : 94
Hey all, I was just curious if for the second grammar point it necessarily HAS to be いません and couldn't be いない also if you wanna be more casual
0
8 years ago
avatar
Site admin
Level: 62, : 5,642
Sure, it can definitely be changed.
1
8 years ago
Years Studied: 2 years
Studying: Grammar and vocabulary
Level: 1, : 55
Hello, I could very well be wrong, but I am pretty sure you are missing a important construction for the second grammar point. I feel that the one you have given is not as comman a construction as the one I will share. But that aside, in order to say "(I) haven't done (verb) yet" you could use this construction: まだ + (negative verb form). So in order to say "I haven't eaten yet" you would say, まだべません. I hope I have contributed some! :)
1
8 years ago
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Site admin
Level: 62, : 5,642
[EDIT]: I just found a 15 page research paper (in Japanese) just on this very distinction; it is a bit too academic for me to parse, but needless to say, I no longer think they can be so easily grouped into two categories, and will wait until someone else can clarify the issue. (original message below) While that works, I would say it is definitely the less used of the two. まだべません is...more of a statement about your intentions/wish, as in 'I will not eat yet'. More commonly this is usually the one covered in elementary Japanese textbooks) まだべていない is using the ている form, specifically, the one that shows a condition or state. In other words, the second one is closer to 'I haven't eaten yet'. I realize that this is not the clearest of explanations - a lot of my knowledge is what I'm absorbed through immersion so a lot of it is more 'feeling' than explicit reasons, so I'll see if I cannot get a grammar expert in here to comment on what you and I have written.
2
8 years ago (Edited 8 years ago.)
avatar
Years Studied: since 2000
Studying: のため、だから
Level: 678, : 4,786
Just like マイコー said, まだ~ていません is by far the more common usage (I don't think I've ever actually heard まだ~ません in 5 years living in Japan...). If you think about the English, we do the same thing - we don't say "I do not eat yet," we say "I *haven't* eaten yet." Since the action is something we may do later, we need to use the て form to show that the possibility still exists.
2
8 years ago



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