Vocabulary dictionary

Kanji dictionary

Grammar dictionary

Sentence lookup

test
 


Describes a state after the action A takes place.
The action was done intentionally by someone.
20
ソファー    ケイタイ                
The cell phone is beside the sofa. Don't forget it!
21
カレー                  
The way to make curry is written on the top of the box.
11
           ので      ように メモ しておいて  
The address is written on the postcard, so please make a note of it so you don't forget it.
4
                       です から       して くれました  
When I got home, the cleaning had already been done! It's my birthday today, so my husband did it for me.
17
         ので          ください  
I've prepared dinner, so please reheat it before you eat.
0
            
I've reserved seats for five people.
1
テーブル                 
My wallet has been placed on the table.

Getting the sentences
These user sentences have been verified by a native speaker.

5
があけてある。
The window is open.
9 years ago (0) (0)
5
はできてある。
The preparations for tomorrow's meeting are done.
9 years ago (0) (0)
7
かけるけど、ってあるからきなべてね。
I am leaving for work, but dinner's already made so eat it whenever you feel like it.
9 years ago (1) (1)
Loading user sentences...

Construction
(Elements in parentheses are optional.)
AVerb: て-form
ある
Basic Examples:
ドアめてある (the door is closed)

Notes
Only used with transitive verbs.
Where this grammar is found


User notes
0

The nuance of てある can change depending on which particle you're using:
— with が it simply expresses a state resulting from an action done intentionally by someone
(e.g., ドアがけてある。 = The door is open. [someone left it open]);
— with を it generally carries a nuance of preparation, much like ておく does
(e.g., ってある = I bought a Japanese dictionary. [bought it to get ready to study Japanese]).

Note that てある does not conjugate in the way that ておく does [ておく/ておいた/ておいて].
Besides, it can't be used to talk about preparatory actions that would be done in the future.
2 years ago
avatar guest
12
It can help to keep in mind that this verb form closely corresponds to the passive present perfect simple form ("has been" + past participle) in English. They express the same things: a completed action and a current state of being for the subject of the clause.

For example:

かがいてある ------> Something has been written on the wall.
10 years ago
avatar guest
18

As an addendum to the note above, while が is most often used, は can also be used in its place depending on the situation.

Furthermore, since this grammar structure shows a current state, it is always written in the present tense.
12 years ago
avatar 宮本勝利 - Level 1
38
This structure basically turns a transitive verb into an intransitive one, so you always use the particle が (and not を) after the object of the sentence.
12 years ago
avatar elsiemarley - Level 1

Discussion about this grammar
avatar
Years Studied: 7
Studying:
Level: 1, : 628
Not a big deal, but there's a typo in the third sentence.

"The address is written on the postcard, so please make a not of it so you don't forget it."

Should be "...please make a NOTE of it..."

Even though it's something insignificant, would you like me to continue notifying you of typos in the future, or not bother? I don't want to seem like a spelling/grammar nazi or anything haha ^^
5
12 years ago
avatar
Site admin
Level: 62, : 5,642
I appreciate all fixes, large or small! I'll be adding a feature in the future where you can directly write in suggestions for fixing the reibuns without having to deal with comments.
2
12 years ago
avatar
Level: 1, : 67
Maybe you can put a note that you have to use が and not を when referring to the object affected, since this structure basically turns a transitive verb into an intransitive one.
1
12 years ago
avatar
Site admin
Level: 62, : 5,642
Good point - why don't you add it to the 'Usage Notes (by users)' near the top - that way, you get credit for it :)
1
12 years ago
avatar
Level: 1, : 67
Done!
0
12 years ago
Level: 1, : 4
Hi everyone ^^ I have 2 questions:
1) Is there a difference between:

A) ドアがまっている。
B) ドアがまってある。

both the forms should carry the meaning of "being closed" right?

2) wouldn't it be better to say "ドアがめてある"? or maybe the both are correct and the difference is:

I) ドアがまってある。(the door is closed - just a status)
II) ドアがめてある。(the door is closed as a result of human action - the door has been kept closed)

I thought that the -てある form was only preceeded by transitive verbs (like written in the note above) like める, but in the example they use "まる".

I know this is not an important point maybe, but i'm really curious about it, so if someone could help i'll be very grateful ^^
4
11 years ago (Edited 11 years ago.)
avatar
Site admin
Level: 62, : 5,642
Thank you for catching that typo - it's been fixed!
0
11 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: 11 months
Studying: This site
Level: 1, : 338
So can i switch this out with ておく?
in the sense of "i left it...in such a state"
0
10 years ago (Edited 10 years ago.)
avatar
Site admin
Level: 62, : 5,642
There is a strong link with おく in that the action was specifically done in preparation or in advance of something else.
0
10 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: 11 months
Studying: This site
Level: 1, : 338
im sorry im soo simple minded im trying to process this sentence. lol sorry
0
10 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: since 2000
Studying: のため、だから
Level: 678, : 4,786
the difference between てある and ておく is the sense of purpose. Something that was done and that's the end of it would use てある (the door has been closed, something has been written, etc). Something that was done to prepare for something else (put papers on the desk *so that someone can use them,* prepared food *for someone to eat* etc) would use ておく. Does that make sense?
Also, like the note above says, てある is always a current state, so it's always written in the present tense. ておく is an action that happens, so it can be in the past tense as well.
6
10 years ago (Edited 10 years ago.)
avatar
Years Studied: 11 months
Studying: This site
Level: 1, : 338
noooo lol i understand the teoku form when it is"doing something to prepare for something" i understand that perfectly
im talking about another usage under teoku
and it says
"to leave as in the state A"
and the example sentences dont look like the planned or did anything in advance
now that i think of it the do kinda of run together but, i want to know for sure.
0
10 years ago
Level: 1, : 0
what is the differences between teiru and tearu? Because both of them describe the state after action A takes place. Arigatou
0
7 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: 1ぐらい
Studying: N5 + N4
Level: 1, : 16

what is the differences between teiru and tearu? Because both of them describe the state after action A takes place. Arigatou

Well, what is the difference between ある and いる? They both refer to a state of being. The former verb is for inanimate objects, while the latter is for animate objects. Is it true that this concept would apply to the てある and ている constructs as well?

0
5 years ago (Edited 5 years ago.)



Loading the list
Lv.

Sorry, there was an error on renshuu! If it's OK, please describe what you were doing. This will help us fix the issue.

Characters to show:





Use your mouse or finger to write characters in the box.
■ Katakana ■ Hiragana