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Like A; Seems A; Appears to be A
Used for information directly seen/heard/etc. by the speaker
きょう 600 えん はい  みたい   
It seems like you can enter for 600 yen today.
4
     みたい         
She's good at singing, like a (professional) singer.
4
この    コーヒー みたい      
This tea is a coffee-like color.

Getting the sentences
Construction
(Elements in parentheses are optional.)
ANoun だった
 
AVerb: Casual
 
Aな-adjective だった
 
Aい-adjective
 
 
みたいだ/に/な
Basic Examples:
だったみたい (looks like footprints)

みたい (appears to be jumping)

みたい (looks fresh)

しいみたい (looks like fun)

Related Expressions
Where this grammar is found


User notes
6

For further clarification.

みたいに is used to say that the subject "does/did do something like something". For example:

みたいにるよ。"You dance like a girl!" Or

あなたはパーティーでみたいにべたよ!"You ate like an animal at the party!"

While みたいな is used to say "like".
For example:

モデルみたいなです。"A model like girl."/ "a girl that looks like a model."

みたいなですね。"A woman that looks like a man."

Although みたいな is much like みたいだ, the difference between the two is that みたいな allows you to expound on a sentence.
For instance:

あなたみたいながすきです。"I like people like you."

トムみたいなはとてもしいですよ。"People like Tom are very fun."

I hope you found this helpful!
9 years ago
Lang_learner - Level 1

Discussion about this grammar
avatar
Years Studied: 8
Studying: JLPT N2
Level: 1, : 168
しそう 
しいみたいです

Are they essentially the same?
1
12 years ago
avatar
Site admin
Level: 110, : 6,629
そう is based on visual information by the speaker, whereas みたい does not have that restriction :)
3
12 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: 8
Studying: JLPT N2
Level: 1, : 168
Ahh! Good to know. Thanks!
0
12 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: ~5
Studying: Intermediate Japanese
Level: 5, : 72
Can this be put into negative, like 'it doesn't look ___'?

'mitakunai' for instance?
1
10 years ago
avatar
Site admin
Level: 110, : 6,629
No - みたい is not an i-adjective, so it cannot be conjugated in that way.
Instead, it would be みたいじゃない
5
10 years ago
avatar
Years Studied: ~5
Studying: Intermediate Japanese
Level: 5, : 72
Aah, okay. thank you for the clarification! That was my second thought on how to make it negative.
0
10 years ago
Years Studied: 2 years
Studying: Grammar and vocabulary
Level: 1, : 56
I notice that you do not have the grammar pionts みたいに and みたいな in the grammar library. Although they seem simular they are used in different ways. みたいに means "to do something like something". For example: みたいにるよ。"You dance like a girl." While みたいな means, "~like". For example: モデルみたいなです。A model like girl/ a girl that looks like a model. みたいな allows you to expound on a sentence, for instance, あなたみたいながすきです。"I like people like you". Thought I'd bring it up. :)
2
9 years ago
avatar
Site admin
Level: 110, : 6,629
Went ahead and expanded the usage parts, and will adjust the meaning to be a bit more inclusive.
0
9 years ago
Years Studied: 4
Level: 1, : 6
What's the difference in using Noun + だった +みたい or Noun + みたい? For example, let's say "だったみたいに" and "みたいに". Would one be "a school that looks like a prison" and the other "a school that looks like it was a prison"?
0
8 years ago
avatar
Site admin
Level: 110, : 6,629
First of, a small note: it should be な if it's preceding a noun (and に if preceding a verb), generally speaking. I would read the first as 'it's a school that looks like it was (once) a prison. I'm not sure what country you are from, but at least in the states, some restaurants have very distinct architecture, so that even if the restaurant goes out of business and some other company moves in, you can still look at the building and tell what it used to be. I would expect the だった form to be used in a case like that.
0
8 years ago
Level: 17, : 0

I'm confused. If みたいじゃない is negative form, then what's the difference between these sentences:

じゃないみたい
みたいじゃない

I came across the sentence in Tae Kim's (the first one). Is the second sentence incorrect? Or have different meaning?
No - みたい is not an i-adjective, so it cannot be conjugated in that way.
Instead, it would be みたいじゃない
0
3 years ago
avatar
Site admin
Level: 110, : 6,629
Ok, so did a bit of research on this one, @jamielin .

The second one doesn't really occur, except for a very specific usage (which I'll get to at the bottom). 

If you were to try and translate them literally, the first it "it looks to not be a dog", while the second is "it doesn't look like a dog."

However, you are not negating the feeling/idea you have (represented by みたい), but you are saying that your observation suggests that the thing you are looking at is not a dog.

Now, there is a way to use it, but it doesn't really have anything to do with みたい. You might know that the negative conjugation can be used to elicit a response from the other party*

A: かっこういいじゃない? (Cool, isn't it?)

In this sense, you could attach じゃない to the end of the phrase to say that you think it is  dog, and you're looking for confirmation from the other party.

Hope this helps!
2
3 years ago



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